Workplace social support and ambulatory cardiovascular activity in New York City Traffic Agents

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TitleWorkplace social support and ambulatory cardiovascular activity in New York City Traffic Agents
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2003
AuthorsKarlin, W. A., Brondolo E., & Schwartz J.
JournalPsychosomatic medicine
Volume65
Pagination167-176
Date Published03
ISBN Number0033-3174; 1534-7796
Keywordsambulatory blood pressure, ambulatory heart rate, blood pressure, cardiovascular reactivity, coworker support, Employee Interaction, Heart Rate, high stress, Social Support, stress, stress level, Stress Reactions, supervisor support, Working Conditions, workplace social support
Abstract

Examined the associations of social support from coworkers and supervisors to workday ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate at the start of the work day, during high stress periods, and throught the workday. Subjects (Ss) included 36 male and 34 female New York City Traffic Enforcement Agents (aged 22-58 yrs). Mixed-model regression analyses were used to assess the effects of self-reported measures social support on blood pressure. Workplace support was associated with workday ambulatory blood pressure levels, with the effects depending on the source of support and the gender of the S. For women, immediate supervisor support was negatively associated with systolic blood pressure level, and a similar negative trend was found for diastolic blood pressure level. For men, coworker support was negatively associated with systolic blood pressure level. We found an interaction of social support with stress level (ie, baseline vs. high stress) such that immediate supervisor support was negatively associated with systolic blood pressure during high-stress conditions, but no effects were found under resting conditions. These findings suggest that workplace social support is associated with workday ambulatory blood pressure, especially during stressful work periods. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)

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