Hostility, Interpersonal Interactions, and Ambulatory Blood Pressure

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TitleHostility, Interpersonal Interactions, and Ambulatory Blood Pressure
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2003
AuthorsBrondolo, E., Rieppi R., Erickson S. A., Bagiella E., Shapiro P. A., McKinley P., & Sloan R. P.
JournalPsychosomatic medicine
Volume65
Pagination1003-1011
Date Published11
ISBN Number0033-3174; 1534-7796
Keywordsambulatory blood pressure, blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, Diastolic Pressure, Health, hostility, Interpersonal Interaction, interpersonal interactions, systolic blood pressure, Systolic Pressure
Abstract

Objective: This study examined aspects of the transactional model of hostility and health by investigating relationships among hostility, interpersonal interactions, and ambulatory blood pressure in a healthy community sample. Materials and Methods: Participants included 65 female and 39 male healthy adults between the ages of 18 and 46 years. Ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) and diary data on mood and social interactions were obtained every 20 minutes for 1 day. Mixed models regression analyses were used to evaluate the relationships among hostility, interpersonal interactions, and ABP. Results: Trait hostility was positively associated with the frequency and intensity of negative interactions and was negatively associated with the frequency and intensity of positive interactions. Interacting with others was associated with increases in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). The magnitude of the increase in blood pressure was positively associated with the degree to which the interaction was perceived as negative. Hostility was not directly associated with ABP/heart rate (HR) or ABP/HR responses during any interactions or negative interactions. However, there was an interaction between hostility and negative interaction intensity for DBP... (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract)

URLhttp://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=psyh&AN=2003-10504-012&site=ehost-live

Food for Thought

Catholic universities will be particularly attentive to the poorest and to those who suffer economic, social, cultural or religious injustice. This responsibility begins within the academic community but it also finds application beyond it.

Pope John Paul II, Ex Corde Ecclesiae (40)